Revamping Framed Web Sites

Phoenix posted a great tip at SEO Roundtable:
Creating a Framed Site Without The Drawbacks to SEO

With regard to search engine crawling and indexing, frames are the SEO’s nightmare. Some brilliant people have taken the time to develop a CSS solution for fixed site navigation, examples:
http://www.stunicholls.myby.co.uk/layouts/frame.html
http://jfy.homeunix.net/misc/example.html

Here is the tutorial:
http://www.webreference.com/html/tutorial24/
Summary: “HTML Frames have been used so far on the Web to provide sections of a Web page that scroll independantly of each other, but they cause a lot of hassle, making linking difficult and breaking the consistency of our documents. CSS fixed positioning helps us work around this by positioning parts of one document relative to the viewport. The overflow property can be used to control their scrolling appropriately. By being careful about how you position these elements, you can have your layout fall back to the default rendering on Navigator 4 and Internet Explorer, making this technique useable in a production environment.”

Tags: ()



Share/bookmark this: del.icio.usGooglema.gnoliaMixxNetscaperedditSphinnSquidooStumbleUponYahoo MyWeb
Subscribe to      Entries Entries      Comments Comments      All Comments All Comments
 

1 Comment to "Revamping Framed Web Sites"

  1. Craig on 16 March, 2007  #link

    I’ve done something similar at a Client site except not to simulate a frame/iFrame but instead to provide the ability to fit more content into a smaller footprint. The CSS is similar in any event.

    But on that same page, you can see why I still use an iFrame, to keep the flash animation and background music from stopping and starting each time a new page is loaded.

    Another way I have come up to do this is to use AJAX to request the actual page desired and then paste the desired parts into the page as required. That way the bots see what they need to see and users see what they “need” to see.

    The URL I listed doesn’t implement the AJAX yet but instead uses an iFrame but with the system I’ve described, there isn’t really much difference between the two.

    By the way, I’ve been going to Stu’s site seemingly forever but somehow I missed the page you mentioned here, thanks very much for blogging it! :-)

    Craig

Leave a reply


[If you don't do the math, or the answer is wrong, you'd better have saved your comment before hitting submit. Here is why.]

Be nice and feel free to link out when a link adds value to your comment. More in my comment policy.