Act out your sophisticated affiliate link paranoia

GOOD: paranoid affiliate linkMy recent posts on managing affiliate links and nofollow cloaking paid links led to so many reactions from my readers that I thought explaining possible protection levels could make sense. Google’s request to condomize affiliate links is a bit, well, thin when it comes to technical tips and tricks:

Links purchased for advertising should be designated as such. This can be done in several ways, such as:
* Adding a rel=”nofollow” attribute to the <a> tag
* Redirecting the links to an intermediate page that is blocked from search engines with a robots.txt file

Also, Google doesn’t define paid links that clearly, so try this paid link definition instead before your read on. Here is my linking guide for the paranoid affiliate marketer.

Google recommends hiding of any content provided by affiliate programs from their crawlers. That means not only links and banner ads, so think about tactics to hide content pulled from a merchants data feed too. Linked graphics along with text links, testimonials and whatnot copied from an affiliate program’s sales tools page count as duplicate content (snippet) in its worst occurance.

Pasting code copied from a merchant’s site into a page’s or template’s HTML is not exactly a smart way to put ads. Those ads aren’t manageable nor trackable, and when anything must be changed, editing tons of files is a royal PITA. Even when you’re just running a few ads on your blog, a simple ad management script allows flexible administration of your adverts.

There are tons of such scripts out there, so I don’t post a complete solution, but just the code which saves your ass when a search engine hating your ads and paid links comes by. To keep it simple and stupid my code snippets are mostly taken from this blog, so when you’ve a WordPress blog you can adapt them with ease.

Cover your ass with a linking policy

Googlers as well as hired guns do review Web sites for violations of Google’s guidelines, also competitors might be in the mood to turn you in with a spam report or paid links report. A (prominently linked) full disclosure of your linking attitude can help to pass a human review by search engine staff. By the way, having a policy for dofollowed blog comments is also a good idea.

Since crawler directives like link condoms are for search engines (only), and those pay attention to your source code and hints addressing search engines like robots.txt, you should leave a note there too, look into the source of this page for an example. View sample HTML comment.

Block crawlers from your propaganda scripts

Put all your stuff related to advertising (scripts, images, movies…) in a subdirectory and disallow search engine crawling in your /robots.txt file:
User-agent: *
Disallow: /propaganda/

Of course you’ll use an innocuous name like “gnisitrevda” for this folder, which lacks a default document and can’t get browsed because you’ve a
Options -Indexes

statement in your .htaccess file. (Watch out, Google knows what “gnisitrevda” means, so be creative or cryptic.)

Crawlers sent out by major search engines do respect robots.txt, hence it’s guaranteed that regular spiders don’t fetch it. As long as you don’t cheat too much, you’re not haunted by those legendary anti-webspam bots sneakily accessing your site via AOL proxies or Level3 IPs. A robots.txt block doesn’t prevent you from surfing search engine staff, but I don’t tell you things you’d better hide from Matt’s gang.

Detect search engine crawlers

Basically there are three common methods to detect requests by search engine crawlers.

  1. Testing the user agent name (HTTP_USER_AGENT) for strings like “Googlebot”, “Slurp”, “MSNbot” or so which identify crawlers. That’s easy to spoof, for example PrefBar for FireFox lets you choose from a list of user agents.
  2. Checking the user agent name, and only when it indicates a crawler, verifying the requestor’s IP address with a reverse lookup, respectively against a cache of verified crawler IP addresses and host names.
  3. Maintaining a list of all search engine crawler IP addresses known to man, checking the requestor’s IP (REMOTE_ADDR) against this list. (That alone isn’t bullet-proof, but I’m not going to write a tutorial on industrial-strength cloaking IP delivery, I leave that to the real experts.)

For our purposes we use method 1) and 2). When it comes to outputting ads or other paid links, checking the user agent is save enough. Also, this allows your business partners to evaluate your linkage using a crawler as user agent name. Some affiliate programs won’t activate your account without testing your links. When crawlers try to follow affiliate links on the other hand, you need to verify their IP addresses for two reasons. First, you should be able to upsell spoofing users too. Second, if you allow crawlers to follow your affiliate links, this may have impact on the merchants’ search engine rankings, and that’s evil in Google’s eyes.

We use two PHP functions to detect search engine crawlers. checkCrawlerUA() returns TRUE and sets an expected crawler host name, if the user agent name identifies a major search engine’s spider, or FALSE otherwise. checkCrawlerIP($string) verifies the requestor’s IP address and returns TRUE if the user agent is indeed a crawler, or FALSE otherwise. checkCrawlerIP() does a primitive caching in a flat file, so that once a crawler was verified on its very first content request, it can be detected from this cache to avoid pretty slow DNS lookups. The input parameter is any string which will make it into the log file. checkCrawlerIP() does not verify an IP address if the user agent string doesn’t match a crawler name.

View|hide PHP code. (If you’ve disabled JavaScript you can’t grab the PHP source code!)

Grab and implement the PHP source, then you can code statements like
$isSpider = checkCrawlerUA ();
...
if ($isSpider) {
$relAttribute = " rel=\"nofollow\" ";
}
...
$affLink = "<a href=\"$affUrl\" $relAttribute>call for action</a>";

or
$isSpider = checkCrawlerIP ($sponsorUrl);
...
if ($isSpider) {
// don't redirect to the sponsor, return a 403 or 410 instead
}

More on that later.

Don’t deliver your advertising to search engine crawlers

It’s possible to serve totally clean pages to crawlers, that is without any advertising, not even JavaScript ads like AdSense’s script calls. Whether you go that far or not depends on the grade of your paranoia. Suppressing ads on a (thin|sheer) affiliate site can make sense. Bear in mind that hiding all promotional links and related content can’t guarantee indexing, because Google doesn’t index shitloads of templated pages witch hide duplicate content as well as ads from crawling, without carrying a single piece of somewhat compelling content.

Here is how you could output a totally uncrawlable banner ad:
...
$isSpider = checkCrawlerIP ($PHP_SELF);
...
print "<div class=\"css-class-sidebar robots-nocontent\">";
// output RSS buttons or so
if (!$isSpider) {
print "<script type=\"text/javascript\" src=\"http://sebastians-pamphlets.com/propaganda/output.js.php? adName=seobook&adServed=banner\"></script>";
...
}
...
print "</div>\n";
...

Lets look at the code above. First we detect crawlers “without doubt” (well, in some rare cases it can still happen that a suspected Yahoo crawler comes from a non-’.crawl.yahoo.net’ host but another IP owned by Yahoo, Inktomi, Altavista or AllTheWeb/FAST, and I’ve seen similar reports of such misbehavior for other engines too, but that might have been employees surfing with a crawler-UA).

Currently the robots-nocontent  class name in the DIV is not supported by Google, MSN and Ask, but it tells Yahoo that everything in this DIV shall not be used for ranking purposes. That doesn’t conflict with class names used with your CSS, because each X/HTML element can have an unlimited list of space delimited class names. Like Google’s section targeting that’s a crappy crawler directive, though. However, it doesn’t hurt to make use of this Yahoo feature with all sorts of screen real estate that is not relevant for search engine ranking algos, for example RSS links (use autodetect and pings to submit), “buy now”/”view basket” links or references to TOS pages and alike, templated text like terms of delivery (but not the street address provided for local search) … and of course ads.

Ads aren’t outputted when a crawler requests a page. Of course that’s cloaking, but unless the united search engine geeks come out with a standardized procedure to handle code and contents which aren’t relevant for indexing that’s not deceitful cloaking in my opinion. Interestingly, in many cases cloaking is the last weapon in a webmaster’s arsenal that s/he can fire up to comply to search engine rules when everything else fails, because the crawlers behave more and more like browsers.

Delivering user specific contents in general is fine with the engines, for example geo targeting, profile/logout links, or buddy lists shown to registered users only and stuff like that, aren’t penalized. Since Web robots can’t pull out the plastic, there’s no reason to serve them ads just to waste bandwidth. In some cases search engines even require cloaking, for example to prevent their crawlers from fetching URLs with tracking variables and unavoidable duplicate content. (Example from Google: “Allow search bots to crawl your sites without session IDs or arguments that track their path through the site” is a call for search engine friendly URL cloaking.)

Is hiding ads from crawlers “safe with Google” or not?

BAD: uncloaked affiliate linkCloaking ads away is a double edged sword from a search engine’s perspective. Way too strictly interpreted that’s against the cloaking rule which states “don’t show crawlers other content than humans”, and search engines like to be aware of advertising in order to rank estimated user experiences algorithmically. On the other hand they provide us with mechanisms (Google’s section targeting or Yahoo’s robots-nocontent class name) to disable such page areas for ranking purposes, and they code their own ads in a way that crawlers don’t count them as on-the-page contents.

Although Google says that AdSense text link ads are content too, they ignore their textual contents in ranking algos. Actually, their crawlers and indexers don’t render them, they just notice the number of script calls and their placement (at least if above the fold) to identify MFA pages. In general, they ignore ads as well as other content outputted with client sided scripts or hybrid technologies like AJAX, at least when it comes to rankings.

Since in theory the contents of JavaScript ads aren’t considered food for rankings, cloaking them completely away (supressing the JS code when a crawler fetches the page) can’t be wrong. Of course these script calls as well as on-page JS code are a ranking factors. Google possibly counts ads, maybe calculates even ratios like screen size used for advertising etc. vs. space used for content presentation to determine whether a particular page provides a good surfing experience for their users or not, but they can’t argue seriously that hiding such tiny signals –which they use for the sole purposes of possible downranks– is against their guidelines.

For ages search engines reps used to encourage webmasters to obfuscate all sorts of stuff they want to hide from crawlers, like commercial links or redundant snippets, by linking/outputting with JavaScript instead of crawlable X/HTML code. Just because their crawlers evolve, that doesn’t mean that they can take back this advice. All this JS stuff is out there, on gazillions of sites, often on pages which will never be edited again.

Dear search engines, if it does not count, then you cannot demand to keep it crawlable. Well, a few super mega white hat trolls might disagree, and depending on the implementation on individual sites maybe hiding ads isn’t totally riskless in any case, so decide yourself. I just cloak machine-readable disclosures because crawler directives are not for humans, but don’t try to hide the fact that I run ads on this blog.

Usually I don’t argue with fair vs. unfair, because we talk about war business here, what means that everything goes. However, Google does everything to talk the whole Internet into obfuscating disclosing ads with link condoms of any kind, and they take a lot of flak for such campaigns, hence I doubt they would cry foul today when webmasters hide both client sided as well as server sided delivery of advertising from their crawlers. Penalizing for delivery of sheer contents would be unfair. ;) (Of course that’s stuff for a great debate. If Google decides that hiding ads from spiders is evil, they will react and don’t care about bad press. So please don’t take my opinion as professional advice. I might change my mind tomorrow, because actually I can imagine why Google might raise their eyebrows over such statements.)

Outputting ads with JavaScript, preferably in iFrames

Delivering adverts with JavaScript does not mean that one can’t use server sided scripting to adjust them dynamically. With content management systems it’s not always possible to use PHP or so. In WordPress for example, PHP is executable in templates, posts and pages (requires a plugin), but not in sidebar widgets. A piece of JavaScript on the other hand works (nearly) everywhere, as long as it doesn’t come with single quotes (WordPress escapes them for storage in its MySQL database, and then fails to output them properly, that is single quotes are converted to fancy symbols which break eval’ing the PHP code).

Lets see how that works. Here is a banner ad created with a PHP script and delivered via JavaScript:

And here is the JS call of the PHP script:
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://sebastians-pamphlets.com/propaganda/output.js.php? adName=seobook&adServed=banner"></script>

The PHP script /propaganda/output.js.php evaluates the query string to pull the requested ad’s components. In case it’s expired (e.g. promotions of conferences, affiliate program went belly up or so) it looks for an alternative (there are tons of neat ways to deliver different ads dependent on the requestor’s location and whatnot, but that’s not the point here, hence the lack of more examples). Then it checks whether the requestor is a crawler. If the user agent indicates a spider, it adds rel=nofollow to the ad’s links. Once the HTML code is ready, it outputs a JavaScript statement:
document.write(‘<a href="http://sebastians-pamphlets.com/propaganda/router.php? adName=seobook&adServed=banner" title="DOWNLOAD THE BOOK ON SEO!"><img src="http://sebastians-pamphlets.com/propaganda/seobook/468-60.gif" width="468" height="60" border="0" alt="The only current book on SEO" title="The only current book on SEO" /></a>’);
which the browser executes within the script tags (replace single quotes in the HTML code with double quotes). A static ad for surfers using ancient browsers goes into the noscript tag.

Matt Cutts said that JavaScript links don’t prevent Googlebot from crawling, but that those links don’t count for rankings (not long ago I read a more recent quote from Matt where he stated that this is future-proof, but I can’t find the link right now). We know that Google can interpret internal and external JavaScript code, as long as it’s fetchable by crawlers, so I wouldn’t say that delivering advertising with client sided technologies like JavaScript or Flash is a bullet-proof procedure to hide ads from Google, and the same goes for other major engines. That’s why I use rel-nofollow –on crawler requests– even in JS ads.

Change your user agent name to Googlebot or so, install Matt’s show nofollow hack or something similar, and you’ll see that the affiliate-URL gets nofollow’ed for crawlers. The dotted border in firebrick is extremely ugly, detecting condomized links this way is pretty popular, and I want to serve nice looking pages, thus I really can’t offend my readers with nofollow’ed links (although I don’t care about crawler spoofing, actually that’s a good procedure to let advertisers check out my linking attitude).

We look at the affiliate URL from the code above later on, first lets discuss other ways to make ads more search engine friendly. Search engines don’t count pages displayed in iFrames as on-page contents, especially not when the iFrame’s content is hosted on another domain. Here is an example straight from the horse’s mouth:
<iframe name="google_ads_frame" src="http://pagead2.googlesyndication.com/pagead/ads? very-long-and-ugly-query-string" marginwidth="0" marginheight="0" vspace="0" hspace="0" allowtransparency="true" frameborder="0" height="90" scrolling="no" width="728"></iframe>
In a noframes tag we could put a static ad for surfers using browsers which don’t support frames/iFrames.

If for some reasons you don’t want to detect crawlers, or it makes sound sense to hide ads from other Web robots too, you could encode your JavaScript ads. This way you deliver totally and utterly useless gibberish to anybody, and just browsers requesting a page will render the ads. Example: any sort of text or html block that you would like to encrypt and hide from snoops, scrapers, parasites, or bots, can be run through Michael’s Full Text/HTML Obfuscator Tool (hat tip to Donna).

Always redirect to affiliate URLs

There’s absolutely no point in using ugly affiliate URLs on your pages. Actually, that’s the last thing you want to do for various reasons.

  • For example, affiliate URLs as well as source codes can change, and you don’t want to edit tons of pages if that happens.
  • When an affiliate program doesn’t work for you, goes belly up or bans you, you need to route all clicks to another destination when the shit hits the fan. In an ideal world, you’d replace outdated ads completely with one mouse click or so.
  • Tracking ad clicks is no fun when you need to pull your stats from various sites, all of them in another time zone, using their own –often confusing– layouts, providing different views on your data, and delivering program specific interpretations of impressions or click throughs. Also, if you don’t track your outgoing traffic, some sponsors will cheat and you can’t prove your gut feelings.
  • Scrapers can steal revenue by replacing affiliate codes in URLs, but may overlook hard coded absolute URLs which don’t smell like affiliate URLs.

When you replace all affiliate URLs with the URL of a smart redirect script on one of your domains, you can really manage your affiliate links. There are many more good reasons for utilizing ad-servers, for example smart search engines which might think that your advertising is overwhelming.

Affiliate links provide great footprints. Unique URL parts respectively query string variable names gathered by Google from all affiliate programs out there are one clear signal they use to identify affiliate links. The values identify the single affiliate marketer. Google loves to identify networks of ((thin) affiliate) sites by affiliate IDs. That does not mean that Google detects each and every affiliate link at the time of the very first fetch by Ms. Googlebot and the possibly following indexing. Processes identifying pages with (many) affiliate links and sites plastered with ads instead of unique contents can run afterwords, utilizing a well indexed database of links and linking patterns, reporting the findings to the search index respectively delivering minus points to the query engine. Also, that doesn’t mean that affiliate URLs are the one and only trackable footmark Google relies on. But that’s one trackable footprint you can avoid to some degree.

If the redirect-script’s location is on the same server (in fact it’s not thanks to symlinks) and not named “adserver” or so, chances are that a heuristic check won’t identify the link’s intent as promotional. Of course statistical methods can discover your affiliate links by analyzing patterns, but those might be similar to patterns which have nothing to do with advertising, for example click tracking of editorial votes, links to contact pages which aren’t crawlable with paramaters, or similar “legit” stuff. However, you can’t fool smart algos forever, but if you’ve a good reason to hide ads every little might help. Of course, providing lots of great contents countervails lots of ads (from a search engine’s point of view, and users might agree on this).

Besides all these (pseudo) black hat thoughts and reasoning, there is a way more important advantage of redirecting links to sponsors: blocking crawlers. Yup, search engine crawlers must not follow affiliate URLs, because it doesn’t benefit you (usually). Actually, every affiliate link is a useless PageRank leak. Why should you boost the merchants search engine rankings? Better take care of your own rankings by hiding such outgoing links from crawlers, and stopping crawlers before they spot the redirect, if they by accident found an affiliate link without link condom.

The behavior of an adserver URL masking an affiliate link

Lets look at the redirect-script’s URL from my code example above:
/propaganda/router.php?adName=seobook&adServed=banner
On request of router.php the $adName variable identifies the affiliate link, $adServed tells which sort/type/variation of ad was clicked, and all that gets stored with a timestamp under title and URL of the page carrying the advert.

Now that we’ve covered the statistical requirements, router.php calls the checkCrawlerIP() function setting $isSpider to TRUE only when both the user agent as well as the host name of the requestor’s IP address identify a search engine crawler, and a reverse DNS lookup equals the requestor’s IP addy.

If the requestor is not a verified crawler, router.php does a 307 redirect to the sponsor’s landing page:
$sponsorUrl = "http://www.seobook.com/262.html";
$requestProtocol = $_SERVER["SERVER_PROTOCOL"];
$protocolArr = explode("/",$requestProtocol);
$protocolName = trim($protocolArr[0]);
$protocolVersion = trim($protocolArr[1]);
if (stristr($protocolName,"HTTP")
&& strtolower($protocolVersion) > "1.0" ) {
$httpStatusCode = 307;
}
else {
$httpStatusCode = 302;
}
$httpStatusLine = "$requestProtocol $httpStatusCode Temporary Redirect";
@header($httpStatusLine, TRUE, $httpStatusCode);
@header("Location: $sponsorUrl");
exit;

A 307 redirect avoids caching issues, because 307 redirects must not be cached by the user agent. That means that changes of sponsor URLs take effect immediately, even when the user agent has cached the destination page from a previous redirect. If the request came in via HTTP/1.0, we must perform a 302 redirect, because the 307 response code was introduced with HTTP/1.1 and some older user agents might not be able to handle 307 redirects properly. User agents can cache the locations provided by 302 redirects, so possibly when they run into a page known to redirect, they might request the outdated location. For obvious reasons we can’t use the 301 response code, because 301 redirects are always cachable. (More information on HTTP redirects.)

If the requestor is a major search engine’s crawler, we perform the most brutal bounce back known to man:
if ($isSpider) {
@header("HTTP/1.1 403 Sorry Crawlers Not Allowed", TRUE, 403);
@header("X-Robots-Tag: nofollow,noindex,noarchive");
exit;
}

The 403 response code translates to “kiss my ass and get the fuck outta here”. The X-Robots-Tag in the HTTP header instructs crawlers that the requested URL must not be indexed, doesn’t provide links the poor beast could follow, and must not be publically cached by search engines. In other words the HTTP header tells the search engine “forget this URL, don’t request it again”. Of course we could use the 410 response code instead, which tells the requestor that a resource is irrevocably dead, gone, vanished, non-existent, and further requests are forbidden. Both the 403-Forbidden response as well as the 410-Gone return code prevent you from URL-only listings on the SERPs (once the URL was crawled). Personally, I prefer the 403 response, because it perfectly and unmistakably expresses my opinion on this sort of search engine guidelines, although currently nobody except Google understands or supports X-Robots-Tags in HTTP headers.

If you don’t use URLs provided by affiliate programs, your affiliate links can never influence search engine rankings, hence the engines are happy because you did their job so obedient. Not that they otherwise would count (most of) your affiliate links for rankings, but forcing you to castrate your links yourself makes their life much easier, and you don’t need to live in fear of penalties.

NICE: prospering affiliate linkBefore you output a page carrying ads, paid links, or other selfish links with commercial intent, check if the requestor is a search engine crawler, and act accordingly.

Don’t deliver different (editorial) contents to users and crawlers, but also don’t serve ads to crawlers. They just don’t buy your eBook or whatever you sell, unless a search engine sends out Web robots with credit cards able to understand Ajax, respectively authorized to fill out and submit Web forms.

Your ads look plain ugly with dotted borders in firebrick, hence don’t apply rel=”nofollow” to links when the requestor is not a search engine crawler. The engines are happy with machine-readable disclosures, and you can discuss everything else with the FTC yourself.

No nay never use links or content provided by affiliate programs on your pages. Encapsulate this kind of content delivery in AdServers.

Do not allow search engine crawlers to follow your affiliate links, paid links, nor other disliked votes as per search engine guidelines. Of course condomizing such links is not your responsibility, but getting penalized for not doing Google’s job is not exactly funny.

I admit that some of the stuff above is for extremely paranoid folks only, but knowing how to be paranoid might prevent you from making silly mistakes. Just because you believe that you’re not paranoid, that does not mean Google will not chase you down. You really don’t need to be a so called black hat to displease Google. Not knowing respectively not understanding Google’s 12 commandments doesn’t prevent you from being spanked for sins you’ve never heard of. If you’re keen on Google’s nicely targeted traffic, better play by Google’s rules, leastwise on creawler requests.

Feel free to contribute your tips and tricks in the comments.



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11 Comments to "Act out your sophisticated affiliate link paranoia"

  1. Igor The Troll on 13 November, 2007  #link

    Good stuff Sebastian.

    I like the iframe and disallow the affiliate JS, but not just because of the searh engines, but if the affiliate server is slow or down, your page will not open, because JS is rendered first, on the client side

  2. Sebastian on 13 November, 2007  #link

    Ads in the last blocks of code positioned with CSS surely helps, also providing the size of DOM elements outputted with JavaScript in the “static” X/HTML code is a good idea. Running ad-servers on slow boxes is not exactly a smart move, since you lose more than you ever could save when you use cheap hosting services. 3rd party adservers are a PITA.

  3. […] Side note: Sebastian is a very smart guy. He pays attention, and works hard. He innovates. But take a look at how distracted Sebastian is by Google’s anti-competitive behavior? He’s right on the money about Google’s consideration of affiliate links and content, but because he’s correct he cannot reach a conclusion suitable for recommendation. In trying to understand Google’s business practices, I’m now leaning towards the word slimy. hard to believe that has happened. […]

    [Basically he said I’m slimy coz I recommended a pragmatic way to deal with the shit or go underground. At least that’s my interpretation. Sphunn anyway.]

  4. Sebastian on 16 November, 2007  #link

    Perhaps I failed to make clear that I’m not exactly happy with Google’s paid links / affiliate links policy. “Paranoid affiliate marketers” wasn’t meant scornful, the term refers to the multiple protection levels I’ve explained, and the fact that in many cases a crappy rel-nofollow would suffice.

  5. Martin on 17 November, 2007  #link

    Hey Sebastian, thanks for the interesting article. Been thinking about it as well lately.

    Regarding John Andrews’ comment - I don’t think he meant YOU were slimy. He said Google’s practices are slimy (forcing us to hide / devaluate / obfuscate ads on our sites).

  6. Sebastian on 17 November, 2007  #link

    Martin, I think John Andrew’s comment is not without merit, not only from an SEO perspective. I understand this blog’s overall message as “more facts than opinions”, IOW technology over politics, hence when Google launches a policy I dislike (respectively enforces it late when they can do it), I rant once or twice, or never, and then I try to provide technical assistance.

    (Ok, there are my pet peeves like the crappy rel-nofollow microformat where I still express my opinion, at least in the source code when I put rel=”nofollow crap” when I’m in a bad mood. Although I’ve to admit that since Google cleared the semantics by interpreting “nofollow” no longer as “pass-no-reputation” –Googlebot once followed and indexed nofollow’ed links!– it’s no longer that crappy, just evil and implemented in an extremely sneaky way.)

    Coming from Webmaster support and training Web developers, I tend to focus on pragmatical solutions when I don’t believe that it’s possible to change something like Google’s paid links policy (which in fact is old news, it goes back to google.stanford.edu). That does not mean I like it, but Google isn’t going to change. I still want to milk out Google’s traffic and it makes sense to help others to survive as well. Also, there are enough folks that take care of the political aspects. Supporting them doesn’t require a change of my blogging attitude towards more political views IMO. Or should I?

  7. Dror on 19 November, 2007  #link

    This might be a bit besides the point but why would you want a spider follow a link to your affiliate?

  8. Sebastian on 19 November, 2007  #link

    Dror, the point is that it makes no sense to let a spider follow an affiliate link.

  9. […] Crackdown Is Just Designed To Create Panic Is Google Going to Expand its Punishments of Paid Links? Act out your sophisticated affiliate link paranoia A Slippery Slope: Google Owns a Search Engine Optimization Company Penalized for selling text […]

  10. […] grab the PHP code for crawler detection from this post. In addition to the functions checkCrawlerUA() and checkCrawlerIP() you need a function delivering […]

  11. Dump your self-banning CMS on 11 May, 2009  #link

    […] links from SERPs still produce weird pages. The developer stumbles upon my blog and adds crawler detection. S/he creates a tuple for each known search engine crawler in the user table of her/his local […]

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